Archive for the ‘Studio Works’ Category

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Cobalt Barn

October 30, 2018

Cobalt Barn – Oil on Canvas – 11″ x 14″

This was started as a demonstration for a workshop I hosted.

The first part of the lesson involved editing the scene. The photo of the scene was cluttered. I made six thumbnail drawings to enlighten the students about the possibilities of this opportunity. The grayish blue structure was my inspiration, my subject. I edited the chain link fence, an arbor, the massive tree behind the barn, an old horse, the fence in the foreground, brush growing to the right and in front of the barn. I amended / modified the building to the left, added the shadows (the reference photo was taken on an overcast day). Simplified the design.

The second part of the lesson was to illustrate to the students that they did not have spend hours doing a detailed drawing on their canvas. Also, to get the students thinking about moving fast to quickly capture the entire scene. Working all parts of their canvas to establish the design.

After quickly applying strokes to get the basic drawing (barn was fairly drawn, but most of the subordinate characters were faint indications and obscure lines. Once this was in place, I moved fast and deferred questions for a few minutes. Just shy of twenty minutes into this work, the students saw that my painting was established. I could walk away from that painting and everything read clearly enough. My point is to keep the students from lingering in isolated sections of their painting. They also witnessed how minor imperfections and mistakes were not fatal. I pointed out areas of the start which would need to be addressed and corrected.

I allowed the students to start their paintings and after I had them painting, I returned to this work. I would paint for a few minutes, then wander around to lend assistance as needed. By the end of the day, this work was basically complete.

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Standing Along Grange Hall

October 16, 2018

Standing Along Grange Hall – Oil on Canvas – 11″ x 14″

Using sketches and plein air studies from last summer, I worked this painting as a demonstration for my workshop students. Although, to begin, I had a loose pastel sketch on the canvas, I applied my oil paint swiftly. I worked to place general colors throughout the entire canvas. Within twenty minutes, I had enough paint in place that the students could see where I was going with this painting.

I allowed the students to start their works. While the students were painting, I moved around the classroom to guide their progress and took occasional breaks to add more strokes of paint to my work. By the end of the afternoon, my painting was basically finished, save for a few tweaks completed at my studio.

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Workshop Demonstrations

September 11, 2018

Demo #1 – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 8″ x 12″

Demo #2 – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 8″ x 12″

Demonstration paintings from a recent watercolor workshop at the Peninsula School of Art. The strategy is to connect areas of the painting to help create unity especially in and with the subordinate shapes.

#1 – started with the sky and moved directly into the background trees – starting at the left and increasing the intensity and vibrancy of the trees as I moved to the right. Then moved to allow these colors to strategically flow into the foreground. After allowing the initial wash to dry thoroughly, I utilized negative painting techniques to separate and emphasize subjects.

#2 – I began with the background trees, moving from the left. As I worked the trees, I utilized this same wash to indicate the shadows of the shed and its shadow.

Often, the initial wash is sufficient to define the important elements and lessen the need for a lot of cluttering details.

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Flower Baskets

September 9, 2018

Flower Baskets – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 11″ x 7″

After placing a quick drawing to set the major elements, the painting was started by flooding the cool, background in one, single wash. I altered the intensity of the colors to help separate components. I allowed this wash to ease into the shadowed areas of the flowers.

After this initial wash was thoroughly dried, I used a damp brush to clean up the components allowing hard and soft lines to work together. Then I focused on the flowers starting with the lightest portions and transitioning into the shadows.

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Flower Box

September 5, 2018

Flower Box – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 11″ x 7″

This design has been used successfully in several oil paintings. I opted to utilize this as another demonstration for my workshop. After doing my pencil sketch, I did all the shadows as a single, connected wash. The shadows alone make for an interesting abstract.

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Ephraim Cottages

September 4, 2018

Ephraim Cottages – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 9″ x 12″

Another watercolor created for my workshop students. I started the painting with the shadows under the eaves of the cottage on the left. I continued through the middle buildings while working the trees in the background allowing the areas to bleed into each other. The juggling act continued through the cottage on the right and into the foreground. I allowed the initial wash to dry thoroughly  before I returned to add a few bolder passages.

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Hoisington’s Shed

September 3, 2018

Hoisington’s Shed – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 9″ x 12″

Preparing to conduct a workshop on Watercolor painting, I searched for a photograph to be used as a reference. I came across a photograph taken several years ago. It was a farm owned by the family of one of my students. Although had tried to work with the photo before, I failed in getting a good, workable design. This time, as I examined and played with the possibilities, it occurred to me to remove the big, red barn which is attached to this shed. I also opted to impose the idea of background woods to add atmospheric perspective to this design.

After establishing a quick, loose drawing, my initial wash started in the tree to the left, flowed into the background woods and into the shadows on the front and side of the shed, and the trees on the right. I allowed some of the initial strokes to flow into the foreground grass. When I did this initial wash for my students, a remark was offered that the initial wash could almost have stood on its own. The painting read well. I continued anyway and ended up with this.