Posts Tagged ‘shed’

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Shed at Beaver Creek

February 15, 2019

Shed at Beaver Creek – Plein Air finished in Studio – Oil on Canvas – 16″ x 20″

A few miles to the east is the work space of an artisan. They make a wide range of ceramic items including water-wigglers. The converted barn is surrounded by fields about a half mile off of the main road. A thick stand of trees keep the farm hidden from the main road. The folks have allowed me to come by and paint the scenery. Except for the attacks by mosquitoes this past summer, the farm is a fairly safe location for painting.

I had set a strategy of working larger plein paintings last summer and fall with the idea that any unfinished works could be completed during the cold mid-western winter. This is one of the first pieces completed. I worked for two hours on location. This painting was well underway and should not have needed a lot of work to finish it. The most stressful aspect was to complete this work in the studio while maintaining the freshness of the plain air work.

Side note: the owners wife informed me that the small sunflowers in the pot were planted by one of the pesky squirrels on the property. Nice touch. I like it.

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Workshop Demonstrations

September 11, 2018

Demo #1 – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 8″ x 12″

Demo #2 – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 8″ x 12″

Demonstration paintings from a recent watercolor workshop at the Peninsula School of Art. The strategy is to connect areas of the painting to help create unity especially in and with the subordinate shapes.

#1 – started with the sky and moved directly into the background trees – starting at the left and increasing the intensity and vibrancy of the trees as I moved to the right. Then moved to allow these colors to strategically flow into the foreground. After allowing the initial wash to dry thoroughly, I utilized negative painting techniques to separate and emphasize subjects.

#2 – I began with the background trees, moving from the left. As I worked the trees, I utilized this same wash to indicate the shadows of the shed and its shadow.

Often, the initial wash is sufficient to define the important elements and lessen the need for a lot of cluttering details.

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Hoisington’s Shed

September 3, 2018

Hoisington’s Shed – Watercolor on Arches 140# CP – 9″ x 12″

Preparing to conduct a workshop on Watercolor painting, I searched for a photograph to be used as a reference. I came across a photograph taken several years ago. It was a farm owned by the family of one of my students. Although had tried to work with the photo before, I failed in getting a good, workable design. This time, as I examined and played with the possibilities, it occurred to me to remove the big, red barn which is attached to this shed. I also opted to impose the idea of background woods to add atmospheric perspective to this design.

After establishing a quick, loose drawing, my initial wash started in the tree to the left, flowed into the background woods and into the shadows on the front and side of the shed, and the trees on the right. I allowed some of the initial strokes to flow into the foreground grass. When I did this initial wash for my students, a remark was offered that the initial wash could almost have stood on its own. The painting read well. I continued anyway and ended up with this.

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Blue Shed

August 20, 2018

Blue Shed – Oil on Canvas – 11″ x 14″

The spot I planned to paint at was not going to work. What I expected to find wasn’t available. Alternate site obscured by hay bales covered in plastic sheeting.

Ventured the back roads a bit. Made my way into a small town. Nothing grabbed my interest. Started to head back home and opted for a minor detour through a small town. Spied this shed and decided to take a shot. Had to do some “clean up” and edit a few things, like an above ground pool. Found a couple other opportunities while there. May have to venture back again soon.

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Idle Time

February 29, 2016
Idle Time 2; Oil on Canvas 24" x 36"

Idle Time 2; Oil on Canvas 24″ x 36″

Had permission to paint at an old farm house. Wondering around the property, I spied a shed. As I moved around the shed, I saw these old, dusty vehicles. The sun was just illuminating the front grills. Knew that this would work. Took some photos and made a few sketches. I  was preparing to paint this scene when I was informed that I was trespassing on the neighbors property. Oops!. Not a major issue, but I did have to tear down my set up and find another subject for painting.

Had to rely on my photos and sketches to create these paintings in my studio. Before I was even finished with the 12″ x 16″ version, I knew I was taking this design larger.

Idle Time 1; Oil on Canvas 12" x 16"

Idle Time 1; Oil on Canvas 12″ x 16″

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Path at Croft’s Shed

August 8, 2011

Path at Croft's Shed, Oil on Canvas 11" x 14"

I used a small study created during the Fields Project to create this work.